Noninvasive Neurotechnology for Man-Machine Interaction

The Bernstein Focus: Neurotechnology Berlin (BFNT-B) posits that neuroscientific results can be exploited for developing robust "real-world" applications that have a major potential for (also non-medical) industry. Similar to the new paradigm of medical research "from bench to bedside and back", the center brings together a multidisciplinary faculty with the aim of directly applying insights from basic neuroscience to relevant applications ("from bench to desktop and back"). The major aim of the BFNT-B is to foster novel noninvasive "brain reading" techniques to enhance man-machine interactions. Their contributions will be evaluated, e.g. in the future-oriented field of usability studies for telecommunications systems and services, or driver-assisted measures for vehicle safety.

The organizational aim of the BFNT-B is to establish a sustainable infrastructure for the development of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces (BCI) and relevant measurement and data analysis techniques. It builds on the existing infrastructure such as the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, excellence clusters, graduate schools and CRCs, eventually extending them towards applications. To ensure implementation of the technologies developed, the BFNT-B is setting up close collaboration with industry.

Furthermore, an Industry Liaison Manager is appointed, with the task to coordinate science and industry and to assure technology transfer from research to application. The scientific part, as well as the study program in neurotechnology that is to be established, will be coordinated by the new chair "Neurotechnology" (W3 professorship), who will strengthen the cooperation between applied projects and technology projects. The chair will thereby support the implementation of up-to-date neurotechnology, as it is developed in this project, with regards to industry-oriented applicability. Moreover, innovative methodologies of data analysis and novel applications in neurotechnology, especially BCI-techniques, will be applied to neuroscientific basic research.